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Bastrop Daily Enterprise - Bastrop, LA
The transition from Steeler Country to Cajun Country
Welsh, Louisiana
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About this blog
By Angie Dilmore
In June 2007, Angie Kay Dilmore and her family moved from their hometown of Pittsburgh, Pa. to Lake Charles, La. The transition from Steeler Country to Cajun Country has been an ongoing adventure. Follow this freelance writer as she finds her way in ...
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Adventures of a Yankee in Cajun Country
In June 2007, Angie Kay Dilmore and her family moved from their hometown of Pittsburgh, Pa. to Lake Charles, La. The transition from Steeler Country to Cajun Country has been an ongoing adventure. Follow this freelance writer as she finds her way in a new state, a new town. The adjustment is an ongoing adventure.
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Between Lake Charles and Jennings along the I-10 corridor lies a sleepy little hamlet called Welsh. With a population of 3,000, this epitome of a small town has been on my to-see list for several years. When I discovered that a friend’s sister owns a restaurant there called Cajun Tales (it’s promoted on a local television station and yes, advertising works) a group of us decided to make a day of it. Or, at least a couple hours, as is the case in a town as small as Welsh.  But there are enough attractions there to make it worth the trip.
Cajun Tales specializes in Louisiana seafood fare. The day’s plate lunch special was fried shrimp with french fries, hush puppy, side salad and some of the best bread pudding I’ve ever had the pleasure of eating. The fried mushrooms received rave reviews. Their fried alligator was also good. Another house specialty is the crawfish pie. I’d like to return someday to try it. Visit them online here.


 
 
After lunch, we set off to explore the town. We found a few shops to browse. There’s a neat, clean, spacious second-hand shop. Grandma’s Garden sells flowers, gifts and chocolates. The Farmer’s Wife sells gifts and specialty items and is adjacent to a hair salon. Around the corner, Cajun Treats sells Louisiana-themed novelties, food items, and assorted other curiosities. Check them out or order gift baskets here.




But for us, the highlight of the town was the Welsh Museum.


This tidy treasure trove of antiquity displays a mix of memorabilia that defines the history of this proud town. Lots of photos tell the town’s story. They have desks, books, and trophies from old schoolhouses, photos of the town’s earliest houses, churches, stores, and other buildings. Vintage clothing depicts the fashions of bygone eras. There are several examples of early typewriters and antique sewing machines, old farm equipment, fragile yellowed business ledgers, and furniture. The museum is housed in a VFW building, so there’s an extensive war memorial exhibit, with uniforms and photos and histories of the town’s many military men. There’s a display case of Indian arrowheads that were found in a nearby excavation. There’s a painting of a world famous fiddle player who lived in Welsh. We mused over old kitchen gadgets and a wringer washing machine. And how about this antiquated equipment from a dentist office in Welsh?




Aside from the Museum, the best thing about Welsh is the Dairy Queen! But we were too full from lunch to stop for a treat. Next time.

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