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Bastrop Daily Enterprise - Bastrop, LA
  • Grain elevator, downtown landmark, to be taken down piece by piece

  • A structure that has been a part of Bastrop's downtown scenery since the 1950s is slated to be torn down in the near future, according to Bar 1 Electrical owner Danny Barmore. 


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  •   A structure that has been a part of Bastrop's downtown scenery since the 1950s is slated to be torn down in the near future, according to Bar 1 Electrical owner Danny Barmore. 
      Barmore said the old Bastrop Grain Elevator Co. facility, located behind the Morehouse Parish Farmer's Market on Pine Avenue, will be just a memory after next week. “The owner asked me to make sure all the electricity was disconnected so they could come in and tear it down,” he said. “I put in a new weight scale for the GEO Chemical Company, but all those tanks are coming down.”
      Barmore said the ownershave special plans for the removal of the pine building, "board by board," on the property facing Bastrop Feed and Seed Co.
      “That's quarter inch thick pine, tongue and grove pine -- it's very unusual,” he said. 
      Barmore said that if salvaged, the pine can be reused in other structures.
      “It can be used as hardwood floor or an unfinished wall,” he said.
      Some Bastrop residents see the elevator as a piece of the past that is now gone forever, while others see the demolition as positive for the city's appearance.
      Morehouse Parish Farmer's Market manager Don Costin has lived in Morehouse Parish since 1955. Now 75 years old, he says he'll miss seeing the grain elevator every day.
      “It won't look the same when it's gone,” Costin said. “It was a cotton gin before it was a grain elevator. I hated seeing them tear that down.”
      Costin said if memory serves him correctly, the cotton gin was torn down in the 1960s and replaced with the grain elevator.
      “It was the McClendon Cotton Gin, owned by Harold McClendon,” he said. “Vernon Sawyer bought it from him and built the grain elevator.”
      Morehouse Economic Development Corp. CEO Kay King said the removal of the building will enhance the appearance of the downtown area. 
      “As the landscape of Bastrop changes with the [International Paper] mill being torn down, it will be an improvement in the appearance around the Farmer's Market,” she said. “I'm happy to hear it's being torn down. It will be an improvement in downtown Bastrop.”

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